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READER POLL 2017
We promise this won’t (really) hurt.

Wanna win a new surfboard? We have a custom Chilli ‘Black Vulture’ to gift (plus all the trim you’d expect from a premium dealer). To be in the running, just answer a few questions for us. It won’t take long.

Close
Close READER POLL 2017
We promise this won't (really) hurt.

Wanna win a new surfboard? We have a custom Chilli ‘Black Vulture’ to gift (plus all the trim you’d expect from a premium dealer). To be in the running, just answer a few questions for us. It won’t take long.

Missing Summer Concerts? Slowtide x Dead and Company Are Here To Help

Summer concerts are a global cultural staple. Sorry, were a global cultural staple. 

While there are some innovative alternatives to "live music" in the works, we all know nothing quite compares to shaking it out under a beating sun whilst nefarious substances seep into your pre-frontal cortex. Thankfully our friends at Slowtide are here to soften the blow with this heady Grateful Dead collab.

Having played their first show in 1965, and with over 2,300 concerts under their belt, we’re sure Dead and Company are missing playing shows as much as we are going to them. Featuring the graphics that (in lockstep with their tunes) have followed and accentuated their career since the beginning, and printed on Slowtide’s 100% sustainably sourced cotton, you’d be hard-pressed to find a more nostalgic way to dry your bones in the summer that never was. 

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Owsley Stanley (aka. 'Bear') was a true renaissance man, having served as the band's acid cooker, financier, and sound engineer. Bearing a remarkable resemblance to a bear itself, this is sure to be in our towel rotation for the rest of the summer. 

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Created by the Owsley Stanley x Bob Thomas mind-melt that led to many of the Dead's most famous graphics, the 13-point lightning bolt was used to adorn their equipment at the disorganized festivals that our parents won't shut up about. 

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Illustrated by Edmund. J Sullivan for "The Rubaiyat by Omar Khayyam" in 1859, and stumbled upon by the Dead in a San Francisco library in 1966, this is one of the best examples of modern icons pulling historical cultural figures we'd otherwise neglect into the current fold. 

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